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Video Games: The MovieHD !EXCLUSIVE!



Brian Tallerico is the Editor of RogerEbert.com, and also covers television, film, Blu-ray, and video games. He is also a writer for Vulture, The Playlist, The New York Times, and Rolling Stone, and the President of the Chicago Film Critics Association.




Video Games: The MovieHD



Methods: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional survey of middle school students (grades 5-8) in the Northeastern United States. We looked at weekday television and video game screen time, weekend television and video game screen time, cable movie channel availability, parental R-rated movie restriction, and television content restriction. The main outcome was self-report of school performance (excellent, good, average, or below average). We used ordinal logistic-regression analysis to test the independent effects of each variable, adjusting for demographics, child personality, and parenting style.


Results: There were 4508 students who participated in the study; gender was equally represented, and 95% were white. In multivariate analyses, after adjusting for other covariates, the odds of poorer school performance increased with increasing weekday television screen time and cable movie channel availability and decreased with parental restriction of television content restriction. As compared with children whose parents never allowed them to watch R-rated movies, children who watched R-rated movies once in a while, sometimes, or all of the time had significantly increased cumulative odds of poorer school performance. Weekend screen time and video game use were not associated with school performance.


Context: Numerous studies have documented the potential effects on young audiences of violent content in media products, including movies, television programs, and computer and video games. Similar studies have evaluated the effects associated with sexual content and messages. Cumulatively, these effects represent a significant public health risk for increased aggressive and violent behavior, spread of sexually transmitted diseases, and pediatric pregnancy. In partial response to these risks and to public and legislative pressure, the movie, television, and gaming industries have implemented ratings systems intended to provide information about the content and appropriate audiences for different films, shows, and games.


Measure: Participants used the KidScore media evaluation tool, which evaluates films, television shows, and video games on 10 aspects, including the appropriateness of the media product for children based on age.


The Video Game Movie Game EXPANSION comes complete with 100 brand-new cards! Let's face it: Some people love movies; others are gamers. This expansion is perfect for when you have company over with a wide array of interests. These cards, similar to the Movie Movie Game cards, combine the titles of classic video games with not-so-classic movie titles! Need an example?


Movies and video games have a troubled relationship. Whenever one medium tries to adapt the other, the results are usually less than stellar. However, the occasional gem will pop, proving the two art forms can successfully link. These moments are rare enough to be considered a special event.


To remember the good adaptations, the following list will take a look at the best video games based on movies. These games were so good, they were even better than the source material. Of course, in some of the cases the original movie was lackluster, but that does little to take away from the game's accomplishment.


X-Men Origins: Wolverine is seen as one of the weaker points of the franchise, especially for its borderline blasphemous interpretation of Deadpool. However, the video game adaptation is pure gold. It closely follows the story of the movie, but also came with an M rating, meaning players get to slice and dice enemies to pieces.


This cult classic '70s movie seems like an odd choice for a video game interpretation, but upon deeper reflection the movie itself is like a video game. All the gang has to do is make it to Coney Island in one piece. Of course, in late '70s New York at night that job is easier said than done.


Tron wasn't the most beloved Disney film upon release, but it garnered a cult following. The plot was just ripe for a video game adaptation, however, and studios delivered. The original arcade game is a classic, though hard to come by due to its age and the decline of arcades.


Toy Story 3 is a fine movie, but the video game companion is an even bigger accomplishment. In 2010, video game adaptations were still seen in a particularly negative light. This game managed to wow with its combination of a traditional platforming adventure game and the innovative Toy Box Mode.


Peter Jackson's King Kong was 2005 cinematic event. a big release back then had to have a video game version too. Fortunately, the developers did their best the adapt the classic story, and the effort was recognized. The game goes beat for beat through the movie's events, making for a dense, yet varied experience.


Star Wars and video games have a complicated history, and modern adaptations of the classic saga haven't done much to remedy it, though Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order seems like a good start on the road to recovery.


When not writing about video games, Jason Wojnar is singing and writing songs. He is also fluent in Ukrainian and received his higher education in vocal performance in Kyiv. He is exceptionally talented at Tony Hawk's Pro Skater and perfectly adequate at just about everything else.


Based on the hit web series, Angry Video Game Nerd: The Movie follows the Nerd, a disgruntled gamer who must overcome his fear of the worst video game of all time in order to save his fans. Hilarity ensues as a simple road trip becomes an extravagant pursuit of the unexpected.


Movies based on video games are usually underperforming, and one of the main reasons why is that many fail to recreate the feel of the original work. There's bound to be some artistic liberties taken, of course, but that only goes so far.


RELATED: 10 Coolest Video Game Fantasy Worlds Everyone Wants to VisitMany fans see these films as a quick cash-grab by filmmakers, with little care put into actually making them faithful to the video games on which they were based. Sometimes they're just a little different, but other times they become completely unrecognizable.


There are many fortunate people who are unaware of this movie's existence. Not only was it one of the worst video game adaptations ever, but possibly even one of the worst movies of all time, too. This was because the filmmakers made the ridiculous decision to make it live-action, which resulted in a nonsensical plotline where the Super Mario Bros. universe was transported into the real world, leading to many of the characters becoming human. It featured Dennis Hopper as a live-action King Koopa, who manifests himself as a spiky-haired villain reminiscent of a punk rock band. It goes without saying that none of the things that happened in the movie were exactly faithful to what is arguably the most popular video game franchise of all time.


Hitman is a video game series that has been running since 2000. In the games, the player controls Agent 47, an elite assassin sent on missions to eliminate some pretty despicable members of high society. Every level, the player is given an objective to eliminate a target (or targets) in whatever manner they see fit. This often involves using a variety of tools, weapons, and even disguises at your disposal to navigate the wide-open areas where your target can be found. There are often multiple ways to eliminate a target: you can go for the classic bullet to the head, or set up a scenario to make their death look like a freak accident, effectively leaving your hands clean.


The recent Uncharted movie is based on a series of action-adventure games of the same name. The movie stars Tom Holland as protagonist Nathan Drake, and Mark Wahlberg as Drake's best friend and father figure, Victor Sullivan. What the movie did surprisingly well was take iconic scenes from the games and recreate them in live-action. The glaring issue was that the movie ruined the canon of the video games.


Monster Hunter is a popular series of Japanese role-playing video games in which players take on the assignment of hunting various fantastical creatures. The games take place exclusively in a high fantasy setting in a completely separate universe from our own.


This movie is perhaps one of the biggest insults to video game fans to ever make it to theatres. Prince of Persia is a series of action-adventure games that take place in Ancient Persia, with elements of Persian Mythology mixed in. The series features its fair share of combat, but one of its main staples was the ability of the protagonist to climb, jump, and wallrun his way across nearly any obstacle.


This film received surprisingly good reviews from critics, and is one of only a few video game movies to ever achieve such. But that doesn't change the fact that it is still pretty far removed from the original Sonic the Hedgehog video game series. Sonic (Ben Schwartz), much like Mario, lives in a universe which is very clearly not real. Unfortunately, the film tried to take a similar route as Monster Hunter, and threw Sonic characters into the real world.


There were multiple Tomb Raider films made, but the most recent instalment focuses instead on the 2013 video game reboot than the classic 90s adventure games. The 2018 film is another classic example of filmmakers nailing the characters, but really screwing up the storyline.


The 2013 video game featured Lara Croft and a group of survivors trying to escape an island near Japan that was cursed by an evil empress who forbids anyone from leaving the island, even after her death. They eventually find themselves at odds with a cult of survivors willing to do anything to get home. While the characters are the same, the film turned the evil empress into an altruistic one, as instead of cursing the island so that none can leave, she became infected with a zombie-like virus and buried herself underground to prevent it from infecting the world. The film's island is no longer cursed, so the plot becomes more of a treasure hunt than a desperate tale of survival. Which is, to be fair, much like some of the other games... just not the one the movie was based on. 041b061a72


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